Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Mosul Campaign Day 106, Jan 30, 2017


The Islamic State continued harassing actions, while trying to maintain its control over west Mosul. The Iraqi Security Forces (ISF) imposed a curfew on the neighborhoods in east Mosul along the Tigris River because of constant shelling by IS. During the day mortars and a drone attack took the lives of three people and wounded another 16. The group reportedly banned its members from leaving Mosul for Syria and imposed a new monthly tax on cab drivers to raise money. It also carried out an assault in the Tal Afar district. The group is on its heels, but it is still putting up a fight. The question is whether it will go down to the last man in west Mosul or will it be like the east with a tough initial defense that when penetrated will quickly collapse.

Monday, January 30, 2017

Mosul Campaign Day 105, Jan 29, 2017


The Iraqi Forces (ISF) and Hashd were both preparing for the next phase of the Mosul campaign. The Joint Operations Command announced that Federal Police units were moving into central Mosul to prepare to cross the Tigris and attack the west. The Diyala battalion of the Golden Division arrived in the city, and the 9th Division was setting up its heavy weapons. The Hashd continued to talk about how important the 6th phase of their operations will be, which includes participating in the new assault on Mosul. The Al Abbas Division of the Hashd is supposed to take part, but it’s not clear in what capacity. The ISF are still resting and re-supplying after three months of fighting. In a few more days they will likely go back into action. The Hashd in Tal Afar district have been holding ground since November. As more time has passed, and they have less to do they have been issuing more boisterous propaganda releases. Baghdad changed its policy and decided that they will be allowed to take the town, despite a deal with Turkey, because it doesn’t have any army of police units to spare because of Mosul. That means they will be back in action soon.

Sunday, January 29, 2017

Musings On Iraq In The News


I was quoted by Paul iddon in “Is Iraq relying too heavily on elite special forces?” in Al Araby, and by Wladimir van Wilgenburg in "Shia paramilitary groups to enter Iraq's Tal Afar despite Turkey's Opposition" in ARA News. Was mentioned by Rudaw in "UN warns west Mosul residents at 'extreme risk'" and in "The fight for Mosul: An assessment of ISIS tactics, key vulnerabilities" by Mike Furlong for Fox News. That last article was also reprinted by Shafaaq News.

Several books on Iraq and the Middle East have mentioned my work as well. Iraq: People, History, Politics by Gareth Stansfield, Vanguard of the Imam: Religion, Politics, and Iran's Revolutionary Guards by Afshon Ostovar, Sectarian Politics in the Persian Gulf by Lawrence Potter, The Master Plan: ISIS, al-Qaeda, and the Jihadi Strategy for Final Victory by Brian Fishman, The Politics of International Intervention: The Tyranny of Peace by Mandy Turner and Florian Kuhn, ISIS: Battling the Menace by Patrick Cockburn, The Syrian Jihad: Al-Qaeda, the Islamic State and the Evolution of an Insurgency by Charles Lister.

Effect Of Iranian Propaganda On Iraq


Iran is now concentrating upon the war in Syria, but from 2014-15 Iraq was its major focus. When the Islamic State swept through Ninewa, Salahaddin, and Kirkuk provinces in the summer of 2014, Tehran was the first to offer assistance to the Iraqi government. Military support was only part of Iran’s program however. It also launched a sophisticated propaganda campaign to promote itself as the savior of Iraq. This was carried out on social media mostly via Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms. At the center of this effort was Iranian Revolutionary Guards Quds Force commander General Qasim Suleimani. He appeared on all the major battlefronts in Iraq again and again on the Internet. The success of this campaign was shown in a survey done of pilgrims to the Shiite shrine in Karbala.

Gen. Suleimani seen visiting the Tirkit front in 2015 (Al Alam)

A group of three researchers working for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology interviewed 1,668 Iranians and 2,410 Iraqis during Arabaeen in Karbala in 2015. Those questioned overwhelmingly supported Iran’s policies in the Middle East. When asked what motivated Iran in the region the most popular response for Iraqis, 40.68%, was to protect Shiite communities. That compared to 27.33% of Iranians selecting that choice. That showed how effective Iran’s propaganda campaign was within Iraq. Iraqis felt like Tehran was helping them more than Iranians themselves. This was of course in the middle of the war with the Islamic State, Iraqis were still feeling vulnerable, and when Iran was pumping up its role in Iraq far above the U.S. led Coalition, which preferred having the Iraqis claim responsibility for their victories. Other factors shaping the response would be the negative view most of those interviewed had of America, as well as religious Shiites being more open to Iran’s role then others. In contrast, a plurality of Iranians, 39.28% believed that national security was the main driver of Tehran’s foreign policy.

What motivates Iran’s policy in the
Middle East?
Iraqis
Iranians
Creating a more stable Middle East
9.07%
22.87%
Ensuring Iran’s security
28.21%
39.28%
Maximizing Iran’s regional influence
22.04%
10.53%
Protecting vulnerable Shiite communities
40.68%
27.33%

SOURCES

Christia, Fotini, Dekeyser, Elizabeth, Knox, Dean, “To Karbala: Surveying Religious Shi’a from Iran and Iraq,” Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 10/20/16

Christia, Fotini, Dekeyser, Elizabeth and Knox, Dean, “Mapping Shiite Opinion,” Foreign Affairs, 10/24/16


Mosul Campaign Day 104, Jan 28, 2017


January 28 was the fourth day with a pause in operations in the Mosul campaign. The biggest news however didn’t come from the battlefield, but on the political front. That came from the Joint Operations command that announced an arrest warrant for ex-Ninewa Governor Atheel Nujafi. Nujafi already had a warrant out for him from October for his collaboration with Turkey. Previously, his unit the Hashd al-Watani also known as the Ninewa Guards worked with the 16th Division and helped free nine villages and neighborhoods on the northern front, and was securing the Hadbaa neighborhood. Given that collaboration, the new warrant had to have come from political opponents. For example, one parliamentarian from Ninewa Ahmed al-Jabouri complained that turning over parts of Mosul to the Hashd al-Watani was a betrayal. Other politicians made similar statements the day before. Nujafi is extremely unpopular in Baghdad due to his alliance with Turkey and Kurdish President Massoud Barzani, and has rivals within Ninewa as well. Like the first warrant however, this new one is unlikely to be carried out as Nujafi can go back to Irbil where he has been based, and where orders from the central government are rarely carried out.

Saturday, January 28, 2017

Mosul Campaign Day 103, Jan 27, 2017


The Islamic State continued to make defensive preparations in west Mosul and to carry out harassing attacks. In the middle of the night IS fighters launched a river assault on two neighborhoods in east Mosul. The army and Rapid Reaction forces turned them back. The insurgents were still forcing people out of their houses along the Tigris River to use them as fighting positions. Out in the Tal Afar district to the west the militants also attacked the Hashd in Tal Ikssiba. Iraqi and U.S. officials claim that IS is a broken force, but they are still putting up a fight for now.

Friday, January 27, 2017

Mosul Campaign Day 102, Jan 26, 2017


January 26 was the second day of the pause in operations between taking east Mosul and attacking the west. That didn’t mean the Iraqi Forces (ISF) were out of action. The 9th Division announced it took Shreikhan. This is a town north of the city, which was first declared freed on January 24. Inside the city the Federal Police were clearing areas of explosives. The ISF were also looking for potential suicide bombers. U.S. Colonel John Dorrian warned of Islamic State sleeper cells hiding amongst the population that could later carry out attacks. Just last week a suicide bomber was gunned down approaching a checkpoint. With so many people staying within Mosul there was no way to screen them, which means there are likely IS members still there. The civilian population has been providing intelligence to the ISF to hunt down these members, but they will remain a threat.

There are not enough ISF available to secure the city while the combat forces move onto the other half of the city. That means the government has to call on others. A Shabak Hashd Brigade is within the city. So is ex-Ninewa Governor Atheel Nujafi’s Hashd al-Watani, also known as the Ninewa Guards. They fought alongside the 16th Division in northeast Mosul, and now have been given some areas of the city to hold. This is a boost for Nujafi is who attempting to rebuild his base.

Retired General Alsodani Ismael wrote a piece on how the first half of the battle went down. The original plan was for the ISF to reach Mosul from the north, east, and south at the same time to spread out the Islamic State defenders. Instead the north and south stalled and the Golden Division reached the east very early on. Two of the army divisions in the north were brand new and had never seen combat before. Some of the commanders were unfit and inexperienced as well. He called for special operations raids, attacking on multiple fronts, and maneuvering in the next phase. The Golden Division were carrying out targeted attacks to eliminate IS commanders. The ISF is pushing a quick assault on the west, which probably involves a frontal assault across the Tigris. They could also move forces to the south and attack from there. The problems the Iraqi forces have in coordinating multiple fronts was exposed in the initial attack upon the city, and they may not have had time to improve. On the last point, the ISF was eventually able to attack across three broad fronts in east Mosul, which eventually connected together. Whether the units are up for a more dynamic plan is yet to be seen. Some Iraqi commanders have said the west Mosul fight will be completely different from the east.

The fate of Tal Afar in the west is becoming clearer. Early on in the campaign the Hashd reached the town, which was then to be taken by the ISF. This was in part due to strenuous objections by Turkey claiming that the Hashd would commit abuses. Recently National Security Advisers Falah Fayad said the Hashd could enter Tal Afar. General Abdul Yarallah added to that by saying that the Hashd supported by the Iraqi Air Force would liberate the town. That change may be due to a lack of army and police forces to take it, while assaulting Mosul at the same time. This will be a huge victory for the Hashd. They have talked about protecting the Shiite Turkmen in the area. The Iranian linked units would also like a presence there because it is a gateway to Syria. That would allow Tehran to move men and material straight across from Iran through Iraq to Syria. If that happened it would be highly ironic. Tal Afar used to be the route Al Qaeda in Iraq and the Assad government ferried in foreign fighters into Iraq to destabilize the country. Now Iran wants to use it to prop up the Syrian regime.

Over the last seven days the number of displaced (IDPs) in Ninewa has decreased, but it is still the highest amount since the Mosul campaign began. According to the International Organization for Migration, there were 159,252 IDPs registered with the government and aid groups on January 20. That went up to a high of 161,238 on January 23, but then after that went down each day to 159,006 on January 26. That compared to 116,292 displaced at the end of December. In 28 days there has been an increase in 42,714 IDPs. With the attack on the other half of Mosul coming up there will be another wave of people fleeing the fighting.

Each day more people are going back to their homes, and the rebuilding has begun. Since October 16 roughly 28,980 people have returned, and that figure is going up. Bas News was in Tel Keif, which was recently liberated. Almost 3,000 people were back, shops were re-opening, and the city council wanted to start projects to restore power and water. In Mosul, the Ninewa council held a meeting with the mayor to assess damage to the city. It opened offices in three neighborhoods to try to restore services and governance. Parliament’s human rights committee called on Prime Minister Haider Abadi to start paying salaries again to people in the liberated areas. Students from Mosul University are pushing for the campus to be repaired and re-opened. Slowly but surely the populace and authorities are trying to get Mosul and the surrounding area back up and running. This appears to be happening much faster than in other cities.

Finally, there were new casualty figures. Based upon reading over 40 papers a day and releases by aid agencies a total of 5,404 deaths have been counted and 16,983 wounded from October 17, 2016 to January 21, 2017. The vast majority of those are civilians with 4,741 killed and 14,842 injured. The Islamic State has been accused of executing 2,798 people. Coalition air strikes have been blamed for another 561 fatalities and 653 wounded. The fighting caused the rest.

Casualties From The Mosul Campaign 10/17/16-1/21/17
5,404 killed
4,741 killed
487 ISF
102 Hashd
70 Peshmerga
2 Kurd CT
1 US Sailor
1 Hasdh al-Watani

16,983 Wounded
14,842 Civilians
1,824 ISF
253 Peshmerga
59 Hashd
5 Hashd al-Watani

SOURCES

AIN, “A parliamentary committee calling for the government to pay salaries in the left bank of Mosul,” 1/26/17

Associated Press, "Iraqi troops push into IS-held villages north of Mosul," 1/26/17

Buratha News, “Recent developments in the field during the process of liberating Mosul until 12:10 pm Thursday 26 01 2017,” 1/26/17

General Ismael Alsodani, “The Operation to Eradicate ISIS in Mosul has Turned into a War of Attrition,” Delhi Defence Review, 1/26/17

Hemid, Leyla, “3,000 IDPs Return to Recently Liberated Town of Tel Kef, Mosul,” Bas News, 1/26/17

International Organization for Migration, “Displacement Tracking Matrix Emergency Tracking Factsheet #13 – Mosul Operations From 17 October To 26 January,” 1/26/17

Al Jazeera, “Mosul University after ISIL: Damaged but defiant,” 1/26/17

Kossov, Igor, “Iraqi troops scour eastern Mosul for Islamic State suicide bombers,” USA Today, 1/25/17

Al Maalomah, “Disclosure of military units during the freeing of right bank of Mosul,” 1/26/17

Al Mada, “Nineveh Council decides to open offices of mayor in left bank in Mosul,” 1/26/17

Al Masalah, “Defense: The process of freeing the right bank of Mosul will be launched very soon,” 1/26/17

Mostafa, Mohamed, "14 killed in eastern Mosul shelling, forces continue clearing last IS pockets," Iraqi News, 1/24/17

Robson, Seth, “US general: Liberation of Mosul involves ‘hardest’ urban combat in recent history,” Stars and Stripes 1/26/17

Shafaaq News, “Nineveh Guard support the security forces in the task of keeping the left coast of Mosul safe,” 1/26/17


Violence In Iraq, Jan 1-21, 2017

In the first three weeks of January the Mosul campaign was the main driver of violence and casualties in Iraq. From January 1-21 there were 488 incidents reported in the press. Of those, 236 were in Ninewa, or 48% of the total. Those incidents led to 1,398 deaths and 3,654 wounded. 950 of the fatalities, 67%, and 2,919 of the injured, 79%, were from the Battle for Mosul. Baghdad used to be the center of attacks in the country, but those have been cut in half since Mosul started. In September 2016 there were an average of 10.8 incidents per day, which dropped to 4.7 by December. That’s slightly up to 5.8 per day in the first twenty-one days of January.

On January 5, a new, but short-lived campaign in west Anbar was launched. The stated goal was to liberate the last towns in the province along the Syrian border. Al Mada quickly pointed out that this was not all that it was cut out to be as Prime Minister Haider Abadi didn’t officially announce it. It also noted that the United States had opposed previous operations because it didn’t want to interfere with the Mosul campaign. In November for example, Baghdad wanted to push on western Anbar, but the Americans intervened. The campaign only lasted around two weeks. A tribal leader told Al Mada, that it would not restart until Mosul was freed. In total around 11 villages were taken, and the Islamic State did not put up much of a fight for them.

While incidents have gone down in Baghdad, mass casualty bombings are up. When the government launched the Mosul operation in October, the Islamic State countered with a car bomb campaign in the capital. In September there were 2 successful vehicle borne improvised explosive devices (VBIEDs) in the capital with 2 more dismantled or destroyed. In October that went up to 4 bombings, then 7 in November, 9 in December, and then 13 so far in the first three weeks of January. A member of the Baghdad security committee accused the security forces of taking bribes from IS to allow their bombers through checkpoints. This has been true for years. This also coincided with the government deciding to take down concrete barriers and checkpoints in sections of the capital at the end of December. Baghdad Governor Ali al-Tamimi promised surveillance cameras and other forms of electronic security measures, but that has not materialized. Given the inability of checkpoints to stop previous bombings it’s unclear whether their removal really had any effect. IS has also changed its tactics. It is reportedly moving from the residential areas to the suburbs and moving assets around to try to prevent them from being discovered.

Car Bombs In Baghdad January 2016-January 21, 2017
Month
Car Bombs
Jan 2016
3
Feb
1
Mar
0
Apr
8
May
13
Jun
1
Jul
4
Aug
3
Sep
2
Oct
4
Nov
7
Dec
9
Jan 1-21, 2017
13

Diyala is one of the provinces where IS is re-organizing and ramping up its operations. From January 1-21 there have been 33 incidents for an average of 1.5 per day. In October 2016 there were 1.4 incidents per day, but that went down to 0.9 in November and 0.8 in December. These have included temporary seizing of towns, attacks on checkpoints, suicide bombings, and car bombs. Before most of the attacks were small shootings and IEDs with regular mass casualty bombings. Now Diyala is seeing large numbers of IS fighters in bigger operations. A Diyala parliamentarian from the Supreme Council called on the prime minister to open an investigation into the security failures, and blamed commanders for negligence. Badr head Hadi Ameri is in charge of security in the province with the Iraqi forces in a support role to his Hashd units.

In Kirkuk the Islamic State has one of its last strongholds in Hawija. The provincial government is increasingly calling on Abadi to free the area, but with Mosul going on that’s not going to happen right now. Hawija is turning out to be a major source of instability not only in Kirkuk but neighboring governorates as well. Cells from Hawija have been blamed for carrying out attacks in Salahaddin for example. There are constant reports of executions within the district, and displaced people being killed trying to escape.

Along with Diyala, Salahaddin is the other province seeing an uptick in insurgent activity. In the first three weeks of January there was an average of 1.6 incidents per day, the highest amount since June 2016 when there were 1.7. Just like in Diyala IS has moved from small hit and run and IED incidents to larger, more organized operations. On January 2, 9 suicide bombers attacked Samarra and were able to seize two police stations before being expelled and killed. Members of the provincial council have talked about IS cells operating in various areas. Also like Diyala, most of the security duties in Salahaddin are under the control of the Hashd. This has caused problems. The head of the Salahaddin council for example talked about too many different security forces in Samarra with overlapping duties and a lack of cooperation that has led to gaps, which have been exploited by the Islamic State.

Violence In Iraq By Month 2016-2017
Month
Incidents
Dead
Wounded
Jan
723
2,418
1,986
Feb
657
1,685
1,724
Mar
683
1,685
2,095
1st Qtr Daily
Avg/91
22.6
63.6
63.7
Apr
630
1,840
1,904
May
675
1,644
2,484
Jun
631
2,111
6,455
2nd Qtr Daily
Avg/91
21.2
61.4
119.1
Jul
531
1,329
1,708
Aug
574
1,263
1,376
Sep
573
1,203
1,602
3rd Qtr Daily
Avg/92
18.2
41.2
50.9
Oct
589
2,965
2,376
Nov
599
4,389
3,972
Dec
583
1,559
11,681
4th Qtr Daily
Avg/92
19.2
96.8
195.6
Jan 1-7
185
509
1,346
Jan 8-14
166
306
1,044
Jan 15-21
137
583
1,264

Violence In Iraq, Jan 1-7, 2017
Security Incidents
185
Dead
509
21 Sahwa
38 Hashd
71 ISF
379 Civilians
Wounded
1,346
4 Hashd
45 ISF
1,282 Civilians
Shootings
48
Bombs
76
Car Bombs
19
Suicide Bombers
18
Car Bombs Destroyed
115
Suicide Bombers Killed
38
Anbar
10 Incidents
15 Killed: 2 Civilians, 3 Hashd, 10 ISF
26 Wounded: 12 ISF, 14 Civilians
3 Shootings
1 IED
3 Suicide Bombers
1 Rockets
1 Suicide Bomber Arrested
3 Suicide Car Bombers Arrested
Baghdad
46 Incidents
126 Killed: 2 Hashd, 7 ISF, 117 Civilians
221 Wounded: 4 Hashd, 217 Civilians
4 Shootings
31 IEDs
1 Sticky Bombs
2 Suicide Car Bombs
6 Car Bombs
1 Mortar
Diyala
14 Incidents
33 Killed: 2 Civilians, 3 ISF, 12 Hashd, 16 Sahwa
15 Wounded: 3 ISF, 12 Hashd
10 Shootings
1 IED
Kirkuk
7 Incidents
2 Killed: 2 Civilians
1 Wounded: 1 Civilian
2 Shootings
1 Car Bomb Destroyed
Najaf
1 Incident
10 Killed: 3 Civilians, 7 ISF
15 Wounded: 15 Civilians
1 Shooting
2 Suicide Bombers
1 Suicide Car Bomb
1 Suicide Car Bomb
Ninewa
90 Incidents
282 Killed: 15 ISF, 16 Hashd, 251 Civilians
1,028 Wounded: 12 ISF, 1,016 Civilians
16 Shootings
9 IEDs
3 Suicide Bombers
3 Suicide Car Bombs
7 Car Bombs
10 Mortars
3 Rockets
13 Suicide Bombers killed
10 Suicide Car Bombs Destroyed
93 Car Bombs Destoryed
Salahaddin
16 Incidents
45 Killed: 2 Civilians, 5 Sahwa, 5 Hashd, 29 ISF
40 Wounded: 19 Civilians, 21 ISF
11 Shootings
2 IEDs
4 Suicide Bombers
1 Mortar
10 Suicide Bombers killed
5 Car Bombs Destroyed
Sulaymaniya
1 Incident
1 Grenade

Violence In Iraq, Jan 8-14, 2017
Security Incidents
166
Dead
306
2 PAK
9 Hashd
21 ISF
274 Civilians
Wounded
1,044
3 Peshmerga
3 PAK
5 Hashd
14 ISF
1,019 Civilians
Shootings
40
Bombs
68
Car Bombs
10
Suicide Bombers
5
Car Bombs Destroyed
97
Suicide Bombers Killed
20
Anbar
13 Incidents
7 Killed: 7 ISF
6 Wounded: 6 ISF
5 Shootings
1 Car Bomb
16 Suicide Bombers Killed
2 Suicide Car Bombers Arrested
7 Car Bombs Destroyed
Babil
3 Incidents
2 Killed: 1 Civilian, 1 Hashd
1 Shooting
Baghdad
45 Incidents
62 Killed: 2 ISF, 60 Civilians
206 Wounded: 2 ISF, 204 Civilians
7 Shootings
33 IEDs
1 Sticky Bomb
2 Suicide Bombers
1 Suicide Car Bombs
3 Car Bombs
Basra
1 incident
1 IED
Diyala
11 Incidents
18 Killed: 3 Civilians, 4 Hashd, 11 ISF
12 Wounded: 2 Hashd, 4 Civilians, 6 ISF
5 Shootings
11 IEDs
1 Car Bomb
1 Suicide Car Bomb Destroyed
5 Car Bombs Destroyed
Kirkuk
5 Incidents
10 Killed: 2 PAK, 8 Civilians
3 Wounded: 3 PAK
1 IED
Ninewa
78 Incidents
187 Killed: 4 Hashd, 183 Civilians
811 Wounded: 811 Civilians
18 Shootings
4 IEDs
2 Suicide Bombers
4 Car Bombs
4 Mortars
3 Rockets
5 Suicide Bombers Killed
81 Car Bombs Destroyed
Salahaddin
9 Incidents
20 Killed: 1 ISF, 19 Civilians
6 Wounded: 3 Hashd, 3 Peshmerga
4 Shootings
3 IEDs
1 Suicide Bomber Killed
Wasit
1 Incident
1 Car Bomb Dismantled

Violence In Iraq, Jan 15-21, 2017
Security Incidents
137
Dead
583
6 Hashd
249 ISF
328 Civilians
Wounded
1,264
13 Hashd
230 Civilians
1,021 ISF
Shootings
29
Bombs
41
Car Bombs
7
Suicide Bombers
5
Car Bombs Destroyed
61
Suicide Bombers Killed
11
Anbar
10 Incidents
11 Killed: 5 Civilians, 6 ISF
37 Wounded: 2 Hashd, 38 Civilians
2 Shootings
3 IEDs
1 Sticky Bomb
2 Rockets
1 Suicide Bomber Killed
Babil
1 Incident
Baghdad
32 Incidents
27 Killed: 2 ISF, 2 Hashd, 23 Civilians
87 Wounded: 2 Hashd, 85 Civilians
6 Shootings
20 IEDs
2 Sticky Bombs
1 Car Bomb
1 Suicide Bomber Killed
Basra
2 Incidents
1 Killed: 1 Civilian
2 Shootings
Diyala
8 Incidents
22 Killed: 2 Civilians, 20 ISF
8 Wounded: 8 ISF
5 Shootings
1 Suicide Bomber
1 Suicide Car Bomb
Dohuk
1 Incident
Kirkuk
6 Incidents
17 Killed: 17 Civilians
22 Wounded: 22 Civilians
2 Shootings
2 IEDs
Ninewa
68 Incidents
481 Killed: 210 ISF, 271 Civilians
1,080 Wounded: 80 Civilians, 1,000 ISF
6 Shootings
2 IEDs
1 Suicide Bomber
1 Suicide Motorcycle Bomb
1 Suicide Car Bomb
4 Car Bombs
1 Rockets
12 Mortars
3 Grenades
9 Suicide Car Bombs Destroyed
52 Car Bombs Destroyed
Salahaddin
9 Incidents
24 Killed: 4 Hashd, 9 Civilians, 11 ISF
30 Wounded: 8 Civilians, 9 Hashd, 13 ISF
6 Shootings
1 IED
1 Mine

SOURCES

AIN, “Deputy from Diyala demanding Abadi open an investigation into the causes of the failure of security plans in the province,” 1/20/17

Antonopoulos, Paul, “Iraqi forces storm western Anbar capturing 11 villages from ISIS,” Al Masdar News, 1/7/17

Hemid, Leyla, “Baghdad Residents Demand Security in Public Demonstrations,” Bas News, 1/9/17

Iraq Oil Report, “IS guerilla campaign intensifies in Diyala, Salahaddin,” 1/19/17

Al Jazeera, "Baghdad: ISIL claims attack in busy Sadr city market," 1/2/17

Al Maalomah, “200 members of the popular crowd enter Sakra western Anbar to secure it,” 1/18/17

Al Mada, “Americans leading the Western Anbar military operation announced by Baghdad,” 1/6/17
- “Liberated area four times and because of lax security threatens security in Salahuddin,” 1/7/17
- “Operation to free western Anbar areas stopped for second time in 3 months,” 1/16/17
- “Salahuddin Council accused factions of the popular crowd from preventing the return of displaced people and threatened to internationalize issue,” 1/4/17

Middle East Eye, “Iraq forces launch operation to retake western area,” 1/5/17

Mostafa, Mohamed, “Army recaptures 8 km between Islamic State Anbar strongholds,” Iraqi News, 1/5/17
- “Baghdad official :security personnel complicit with Islamic State,” Iraqi News, 1/3/17

Rudaw, "UPDATED: Curfew imposed in Samarra after armed attacks on police," 1/2/17

Saleh, Ibrahim, “An Agile Opponent: Extremists Change Tactics in Baghdad,” Niqash, 1/19/17

Sattar, Omar, “Why is Baghdad removing checkpoints during security crisis?” Al Monitor, 1/5/17

Sotaliraq, "Samarra operations: more than five suicide bombers killed and the situation is under control," 1/2/17

Xinhua, “Iraqi female journalist set free after abduction by gunmen,” 1/4/17
- "Suicide bombers attack 2 police stations in Iraq's Samarra," 1/3/17

Security In Iraq April 15-21, 2017

The number of reported security incidents in Iraq took another drop for the third straight week. There were 106 incidents mentioned in th...