Monday, April 18, 2011

Institute For War & Peace Reporting Baghdad Photo Essay

London’s Institute for War & Peace Reporting has been working in Iraq for years, providing training and assistance to the countries reporters. Recently they ran a photo essay of Baghdad by Hazim al-Sharaa, Mariwan Hama-Saeed, Emad al-Sharaa, and Haidar Khudir, marking the eight-year anniversary of the fall of Saddam Hussein following the 2003 United States Invasion. The pictures capture the daily life in the capital, along with some of the social and political issues that mark the city.

Institute for War & Peace Reporting
A picture of Firdos Square, which was made world famous during the U.S. invasion when Iraqis, with the aid of American army unit, tore down a statue of Saddam on April 9, 2003. The base of the statue is still standing, pictured in the foreground.

Institute for War & Peace Reporting
Al-Bawateen neighborhood of Baghdad used to be a Jewish section of the city, but it has since fallen into disrepair. This picture highlights the lack of services such as garbage disposal, sanitation, etc.

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The Ishtar Sheraton (left) and the Palestinian Meridian (right) hotels housed diplomats and the foreign press, and were often attacked by militants. Both are currently being renovated in anticipation of the Arab League Summit, planned for May 2011. Note the blast walls in front.

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Mutanabi Street is famous for its book market.

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Checkpoint in front of Baghdad University in the Jadriya district.

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The Sadrists held an anti-American demonstration in Mustansiriya Square on April 9, 2011 to mark the fall of Saddam. Protesters called for the removal of US. troops by the end of the year, and for the government not to extend the State of Forces Agreement with Washington.

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A chef on Abu Nawas Street prepares a fire for grilled fish in the backyard of a restaurant along the Tigris River.

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Students in front of Baghdad University. The man with a briefcase was heading home to Fallujah to see his family despite a curfew that was imposed there at the time.

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Two men selling petrol in Sadr City.

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A web of electrical wires connecting private generators to local houses and businesses in eastern Baghdad. This is a common site as the national grid doesn’t provide enough power to meet the demands of the public.

Institute for War & Peace Reporting
A bullet pockmarked building up for sale in the Jamila district. The area was the scene of intense fighting with the Mahdi Army in 2008 as part of the government crackdown on the militia.

Institute for War & Peace Reporting
Shnawa Juma of the Bayaa district of southwestern Baghdad complained about the blast walls erected in front of his house. He said that his residence use to sit on the main street of his neighborhood, but the walls cut him off from the thoroughfare.

SOURCE

IWPR Contributors, “Baghdad – Eight Years After Saddam,” Institute for War & Peace Reporting, 4/15/11

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