Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Partial Iraqi Cabinet Approved By Parliament (REVISED)

On December 21, 2010 Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki walked into parliament, rattled off the names of 29 minister nominees, who were then elected by a hand vote by lawmakers. The group then posed for pictures, and the event was over. In those few minutes Iraq took its first step towards having a new acting government.

13 of the 42 ministries still don’t have heads. These include some of the most hotly contested positions such as Defense, Interior, National Security, and Electricity. Maliki is running the security ministries, while newly elected officials are in charge of the rest. The premier has promised to fill all of the posts before the December 25 deadline to form a new government. This was similar to Maliki’s first coalition announced in 2006 when the security ministries were also not filled until almost a month after the initial cabinet was put together.

Despite the Prime Minister’s calls for qualified and competent nominees for each ministry, his new cabinet was cobbled together in just a few hours before they were announced publicly. Maliki later said he didn’t even know anything about some of the officials.

The positions in the new government were distributed by the size of each winning list. The State of Law-Sadrist led Iraqi National Coalition walked away with the most positions as they were the largest bloc. It received the premiership, deputy premier for energy, deputy speaker of parliament, and 21 ministries, seven of which are temporary. Within the list, Maliki’s State of Law got 13 offices, five of which are temporary, the Sadrists received seven posts, two of which are temporary, Fadhila two, and the Supreme Islamic Iraqi Council and Hezbollah Iraq won one each. Iyad Allawi’s Iraqi National Movement was next with eleven, followed by nine for the Kurdish Coalition, three of which are temporary, two for the Centrist Alliance, and one for the Assyrian Democratic Movement, a Christian party. Allawi is also going to head the new National Council for Strategic Policy, but it has to be created by new legislation passed by parliament.

Along with ministries, the major Kurdish parties also walked away from the day with a promise by Maliki to fulfill their 19 demands. The prime minister signed onto the 19-points just before the cabinet was made public. The list includes implementation of Article 140 that will determine the future of Kirkuk and other disputed areas and resolving the Kurds’ oil deals. Later the Kurdish Coalition claimed that Maliki pledged to follow through with Article 140 within two years. The previous two administrations made the same deal with the Kurds, but never followed through. Whether Maliki will this time around is one of the most important decisions he will be making because it involves such divisive topics that it could derail his entire government.

On the other hand, the Kurdish opposition group the Change List, ended up leaving the new government. They demanded two service ministries and a deputy premiership, but were only offered one. Disappointed, they decided to go into the opposition instead, claiming that the Iraqi National Coalition tried to marginalize them, while the Kurdish Coalition was pressuring them to rejoin their list. This marked the first time a winning party in post-2003 Iraq has not wanted to partake in the spoils of power.

Overall, Maliki’s new ruling coalition is a mixed bag. Unlike his 2006 government, Allawi, Sunni, and nationalist parties, will have a much larger role this time around. At the same time, there are so many entities involved that they had to create new positions just to satisfy all of them. The major blocs also come with competing agendas over Iraq’s major issues such as oil, federalism, security, and the disputed territories. That will mean the new government will act much like the last one with deadlock, indecision, and procrastination on the problems that beset the country. That may also allow the premier to continue to consolidate his hold on power as he did last time. The near future in Iraq, may look a lot like the recent past.

New Iraqi Government

Top Posts

  • Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, Dawa, State of Law, Iraqi National Coalition, and acting Minister of Defense, Interior, and National Security
  • President Jalal al-Talabani, Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, Kurdish Coalition
  • Speaker of Parliament Osama Nujafi, Iraqi National List, Iraqi National Movement

Deputies

  • Deputy Premier Saleh al-Mutlaq, Iraqi National Dialogue Front, Iraqi National Movement
  • Deputy Premier Roj Nouri Shaways, Kurdistan Democratic Party, Kurdish Coalition, and acting Minister of Trade
  • Deputy Premier for Energy Hussein al-Shahristani, State of Law, Iraqi National Coalition, and acting Minister of Electricity
  • Deputy Speaker of Parliament Qusay Abdul Wahab Suhail, Sadr, Iraqi National Coalition 
  • Deputy Speaker of Parliament Aref Tayfour, Kurdistan Democratic Party, Kurdish Coalition

Cabinet

  • Minister of Agriculture, Izz al-Din al-Dawla, Iraqi National List, Iraqi National Movement
  • Minister of Communication Muhammad Tawfaq Allawi, Iraqi National List, Iraqi National Movement
  • Minister of Culture Sadoun Dulaimi, Unity of Iraq, Centrist Alliance
  • Minister of Education Muhammad Tamim, Iraqi National Dialogue Front, Iraqi National Movement
  • Minister of Environment Sargon Sliwa Lazar, Assyrian Democratic Movement
  • Minister of Finance Rafi Issawi, National Future Gathering, Iraqi National Movement
  • Minister of Foreign Affairs Hoshyar Zebari, Kurdistan Democratic Party, Kurdish Coalition, and acting Minister for Women Affairs
  • Minister of Health Muhammad Amin, Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, Kurdish Coalition
  • Minister of Higher Education Ali al-Adeeb, State of Law, Iraqi National Coalition, and Acting Minister of National Reconciliation
  • Minister of Housing Muhammad Darraji, Sadr, Iraqi National Coalition, and acting Minister of Public Works
  • Minister of Human Rights Muhammad Shaia’a Sudani, State of Law, Iraqi National Coalition 
  • Minister of Immigration and Displacement Dindar Shafiqq, Kurdistan Islamic Union, Kurdish Coalition, and acting Minister of Civil Society
  • Minister of Industry Ahmad Nasser al-Dali Karbuli, Renewal List, Iraqi National Movement
  • Minister of Justice Hasan Shammari, Fadhila, Iraqi National Coalition
  • Minister of Labor Nassar Rubaie, Sadr, Iraqi National Coalition, and acting Minister Of Planning
  • Minister of Oil Abdul Karim Luaibi, State of Law, Iraqi National Coalition
  • Minister of Science and Technology Abdul Karim al-Samarraie, Renewal List, Iraqi National Movement
  • Minister of Sports Jasim Muhammad Jaffar, State of Law, Iraqi National Coalition
  • Minister of State Salah Muzahim Darwish, Iraqi National Dialogue Front, Iraqi National Movement
  • Minister of State Abdul al-Mahdi al-Mutayri, Sadr, Iraqi National Coalition
  • Minister of State Salah Jabouri, Iraqi National Dialogue Front, Iraqi National Movement
  • Minister of State Hassan al-Sari, Hezbollah Iraq, Iraqi National Coalition
  • Minister of State Bushra Hussain Saleh, Fadhila, Iraqi National Coalition 
  • Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Ali al-Sajri, Unity of Iraq, Centrist Alliance
  • Minister of State for Government Spokesmanship Ali al-Dabbagh, State of Law, Iraqi National Coalition
  • Minister of State for Parliamentary Affairs Safi al-Din al-Safi, State of Law, Iraqi National Coalition
  • Minister of State for Provincial Affairs Turan Matthaw Hassan, Iraqi Turkmen Front, Iraqi National Movement 
  • Minister of State for Tribal Affairs Jamal Batikh, Iraqi National Movement
  • Minister of Tourism Lewaa Smisam, Sadr, Iraqi National Coalition
  • Minister of Transportation Hadi al-Ameri, Badr Organization/Supreme Islamic Iraqi Council, Iraqi National Coalition

Positions By List

  • Iraqi National Coalition: Prime Minister, Deputy Premier for Energy, Deputy Speaker of Parliament, Ministries of Defense (temp), Education, Electricity (temp), Housing, Human Rights, Interior (temp), Justice, Labor, National Reconciliation (temp), National Security (temp), Oil, Planning (temp), Public Works (temp), Sports, State x3, State for Foreign Affairs, State for Government Spokesmanship, State for Parliamentary Affairs, Tourism, Transportation - 21 ministries total, 7 temporary
  1. State of Law: Prime Minister, Deputy Premier for Energy, Ministries of Defense (temp), Education, Electricity (temp), Human Rights, Interior (temp), National Reconciliation (temp), National Security (temp), Oil, Sports, State for Government Spokesmanship, State for Parliamentary Affairs - 11 ministries total, 5 temporary
  2. Sadrists: Deputy Speaker of Parliament, Ministries of Housing, Labor, Planning (temp), Public Works (temp), State, Tourism - 6 ministries total, 2 temporary
  3. Fadhila: Ministries of Justice, State - 2 ministries total
  4. Hezbollah Iraq: Ministry of State - 1 ministry total
  5. Supreme Islamic Iraqi Council: Ministry of Transportation - 1 ministry total
  • Iraqi National Movement: Speaker of Parliament, Deputy Premier, Ministries of Agriculture, Communication, Education, Finance, Industry, Science and Technology, State x2, State for Provincial Affairs, State for Tribal Affairs - 10 ministries total
  1. Iraqi National List: Speaker of Parliament, Ministries of Agriculture, Communication - 2 ministries total
  2. Iraqi National Dialogue Front: Deputy Premier, Ministries of Education, State x2 - 3 ministries total
  3. National Future Gathering: Ministry of Finance - 1 ministry total
  4. Renewal List: Ministries of Industry, Science and Technology - 2 ministries total
  5. Iraqi Turkmen Front: Minister of State for Provincial Affairs - 1 ministry total
  • Kurdish Coalition: President, Deputy Premier, Deputy Speaker of Parliament, Ministries of Civil Society (temp), Foreign Affairs, Health, Immigration and Displacement, Trade (temp), Women Affairs (temp) - 6 ministries total, 3 temporary
  1. Kurdistan Democratic Party: Deputy Premier, Deputy Speaker of Parliament, Ministries of Foreign Affairs, Trade (temp), Women Affairs (temp) - 3 ministries total, 2 temporary
  2. Patriotic Union of Kurdistan: President, Ministry of Health - 1 ministry total
  3. Kurdistan Islamic Union: Ministries of Civil Society (temp), Immigration and Displacement - 2 ministries total, 1 temporary
  • Centrist Alliance: Ministry of Culture, Minister of State for Foreign Affairs - 2 ministries total
  • Assyrian Democratic Movement: Ministry of Environment - 1 ministry total

SOURCES

Agence France Presse, “A lone woman in Iraq’s new cabinet,” 12/21/10

Alaadin, Ranj, “#Iraq names cabinet – finally,” Ranj Alaaldin Blog, 12/21/10

Ali, Yaser, "KBC: Maliki signs agreement to Kurdish conditions," AK News, 12/21/10

Ali, Saman, "Maliki signed to implement article 140 in two years," AK News, 12/21/10

Ashur TV, “Ashur t.v. Interview with Mr. Sargon Lazar, of Foreign the Assyrian Democratic Movement,”  Christians Of Iraq, 2/29/08

Aswat al-Iraq, “Nejeifi named parl. Speaker, Suhail and Tayfour deputies,” 11/11/10
- “The new cabinet line-up announced by al-Maliki,” 12/21/10
- "North Iraq Kurdistan's "Change" Bloc withdraws from new cabinet," 12/21/10

BBC, “Iraqi parliamentary approves new government,” 12/21/10

Chulov, Martin, "Iraq names cabinet after nine-month power struggle," Guardian, 12/21/10

Healy, Jack, "Cleric's Anti-U.S. Forces Poised for Gains in Iraq," New York Times, 12/19/10

Ibrahim, Haider, “No minister assigned without my consent says Maliki,” AK News, 11/27/10

Katzman, Kenneth, "Iraq: Politics, Elections, and Benchmarks," Congressional Research Service, 4/22/09
- "Iraq: Reconciliation and Benchmarks," Congressional Research Service, 5/12/08

Kazmi, Haider, "Maliki spoke frankly and undermine his confidence: I am not convinced I do not know anything about some ministers," Al-Aalem, 12/21/10

Long, Austin, “Why Anbar voted for Allawi,” Foreign Policy, 4/5/10

Omaima, Younis, “Iraqiya got 9 ministries and the Sadrists 8, and 6 for the Kurds, and only 4 of the State of Law,” Al-Aalem, 12/21/10

Surk, Barbara and Abdul-Zahra, Qassim, "Iraq finally has a new government," Associated Press, 12/21/10

Visser, Reidar, “Change Inside Iraqiyya?” Iraq And Gulf Analysis, 11/14/10
- “Parliament Approves the Second Maliki Government,” Historiae, 12/21/10

Wikipedia, “Rafi al-Issawi”

8 comments:

Ali W said...

I love this site, and so do many of my friends, keep them coming

Joel Wing said...

Thanks. I wish more would comment!

Anonymous said...

Correcton: Nassar Al Rubaie is the Minister of Laour and Social Affairs and the Acting Minister of Planning.

Hitat Hitat

Joel Wing said...

Thanks will change

Anonymous said...

how many ministries are there now and what's the increase? Thanks, great stuff Joel.

Joel Wing said...

Anon,

By the end of the first Maliki administration there were two deputy premiers and 37 ministries. This time there's 3 deputies and 39 ministries were named on Dec. 22. When all the posts are named there might be 42 ministries in total.

Joel Wing said...

P.S. the two vice presidents also disappeared because the Presidential Council has dissolved. There's talk about bringing them back, but that would require new legislation by parliament just like the National Council for Strategic Policies Allawi is supposed to head requires.

Joel Wing said...

Anon,

Sorry only 38 ministries were announced on Dec. 22.

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